Bivisible

Bivisible

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Bivisible
Brown Bivisible
Tying Instructions
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      Actual Midge Clusters
      Baetis

Notes: Edward HewittThe Bivisible is a classic fly that was introduced by Edward Hewitt (1866-1951) in 1926 in his book, "Telling on the Trout". Mr. Hewitt states: "Dark colors are more visible to the trout from below than light colors, and, therefore, take more fish under most conditions and are more generally used. They are often, however, more difficult to see on the water than the lighter flies. This is the reason for my favorite design of fly which I call the BiVisible which consists of a palmer-tied brown hackle on the head of which is wound a small wisp of white hackle. The white resting against the brown becomes very visible in most lights to the angler; on the other hand, the trout see the brown hackle from below better than any other color used. This fly is by far the best of any I have yet seen for all species of trout and it is based on a sound physical principle." It has remained a standard attractor fly through the years either mimicing a skating caddis, ants, beetles, or a midge cluster. The Bivisible was developed to use two contrasting colors. The darker colors are more readily visible to the trout while the contrast of the light against dark colors allowed the flyfishermen to see the fly on the water more easily. The pattern is often used in faster broken water since it has high floatability. The use of palmering the hackle over the body is a old technique going back perhaps to the 1700's. Mr. Hewitt presented the first Bivisible as a Brown Hackle body with a White hackle wisp at the head. This pattern has been recognized as the Brown Bivisible.
Hewitt did not add a tail to the pattern but tails are often seen on this pattern. Some use hackle fibers, others use hackle tips for the tail. Using the Catskill proportions, the tail length should be about the same as the shank length. Different combinations of hackles have been used by tiers, Mr. Charles Merrill of Detroit, MI is credited with the Badger Bivisible sometime in the 1930's and Hank Wilson, a guide on the White River in Arkansas is credited with the Bulbous Bivisible in the late 1970's.

Often the pattern is tied on a standard dry fly hook such as the TMC 100. However, for a more traditional appearance, you might consider using the Daiichi 1170 which is a 1X long Traditional Dry Fly hook with a larger barb. This extra length provides nice proportions to the fly. Both hackles should be sized to the hook. The rear hackle should cover the lower 3/4 of the hook shank and the front hackle should be about five turns just in front of the rear hackle. Hackle tips should be even across the length of the shank. Maintain a smooth even thread wrap foundation to the hook shank to ensure that the hackle fibers will be perpendicular to the shank.

Variations:



Brown Bivisible w/ Tail
Brown Bivisible


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Badger Bivisible
Badger Bivisible


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Grizzly Bivisible
Grizzly Bivisible


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Bulbous Bivisible
Bulbous Bivisible


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