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California Hot Springs

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California Hot Springs and White River
Suggested Flies for California Hot Springs and White River:
Southern Sierra Hatch Selection

Other Local Favorites:

Dry Flies:
Parachute Adams #12
Elk Hair Caddis #14-16
St. Vrain Caddis

Nymph Flies:
Pheasant Tail Nymph #12-14
Gold Ribbed Hare's Ear #12-14
Prince Nymph #12-14
Bird's Nest #12-14
Zug Bug #12-14

Directions:

Calif Hot Springs Directions

Access to the California Hot Springs area and Deer Creek is by Mtn Road 56 (Hot Springs Road) from Ducor. Ducor is along Hwy 65 just south of Porterville. Mtn Road 56 ends at the intersection of Parker Pass Road (Mtn Road 50) and Pine Flat Road. Parker Pass Road goes through Parker Pass to an intersection with the Great Western Divide Highway. Mtn Road 50 continues east to Johnsondale.

Notes: Tyler Creek
Within the Giant Sequoia National Monument near California Hot Springs are many potential trout streams but most have been degraded by cattle grazing and road construction. These streams are considered class II since even though they are suitable for Rainbows spawning, the food supply is limited.

Parker Meadow Creek: Parker Meadow Creek is considered a class II stream associated with rainbow trout. There is some natural reproduction but food is limited. The headwaters are located in Parker Meadow and it flows about 7.6 miles into South Creek. Most of this stream is steep to moderate gradient with boulders and cobble channels. 1/3 of the stream is within meadows. Cattle grazing has degraded this stream with unstable banks and poor riparian cover.

Double Bunk Creek: Doublebunk Creek is considered a class II stream associated with rainbow trout. The headwaters are located in Doublebunk Meadow and travels about 2.9 miles into Packsaddle Creek. Most of the creek is within a meadow habitat but has unstable banks and low cover due to cattle grazing. High amounts of silt due to road banks nearby.

Bear Creek: Bear Creek is considered a class II stream associated with rainbow trout. The headwaters are located in Powderhorn Meadow and travels about 2.5 miles into South Creek. Most of the stream is limited as a fishery due to a moderate width-to-depth ration and poor vegetative cover. The meadows get high cattle useage.

Packsaddle Creek: Packsaddle Creek is a class II stream associated with rainbow trout. Headwaters are located in Packsaddle Meadow and travels about 2 miles into Bear Creek. About a third of this stream has a steep bedrock gradient with another third within a meadow habitat. The meadow portion has high bank cutting and sedimentation as well as sparse vegetative cover due to high cattle usesage.

The Upper Deer Creek and White River Basin has a number of streams that once flowed into Tulare Lake that prior to 1880 was one of our largest lakes within California. Today, it no longer exists, since the water has been diverted to agricultural and urban needs. The two primary streams: Deer Creek flows 90 miles and ends about 10 miles east of Terra Bella while White River flows about 100 miles and ends 20 miles east of Delano. Both of these streams are considered to be class I trout streams meaning they could support a healthy population of trout. They have excellent to very good insect habitat.

White River: White River is a class I stream associated with rainbow trout with excellent spawning and food supply. It's headwaters are in Bull Run Meadow. The river travels nearly 5.5 within the Giant Sequoia National Monument until it reaches private landholdings. Some cattle grazing occurs around the White River Campground but most of the impact is from recreation and roads impacting the stream banks. Above the White River Campground the stream has a high concentration of silt with pools and riffles, located in a granitic area with coniferous forest. Hatchery Trout are planted here annually.

Deer Creek: Deer Creek is also a class I stream that supports a population of rainbow trout and is considered a 7 mile long cold water fishery within the boundaries of the Giant Sequoia National Monument. Headwaters originate in Pup Meadow and drain west to the Tulare Lake basin. The channel is predominantly (83 percent) a steep bedrock boulder dominated naturally-stable channel. Near Leavis Campground , Deer Creek is a rocky stream with riffles, in an area surrounded by brush and hardwood forest. Fish early in the season. Hatchery Rainbows planted annually.

Tyler Creek: Tyler Creek is a class I stream associated with rainbow trout. It covers about six miles within the forest boundary. Tyler Creek drains into Deer Creek.

Spear Creek: Spear Creek is a class I stream with rainbow trout that drains into Poso Creek about one-half mile west of the forest/Monument boundary. Naturally-stable steep boulder and cobble channel types comprise the greatest portion of the stream. Width-to-depth ratios and sediment affect aquatic habitat conditions and are associated with unstable stream banks and poor water quality. Cover complexity is moderate with low to moderate amounts of streamside vegetation. Located in a granitic area with coniferous forest. Poso Park features easy walking along the stream with pools and riffles. Hatchery Rainbows planted at times, not annually.



Fishing Regulations (Effective March 1st, 2021)

Local Rivers and Streams within Giant Sequoia National Monument and Sequoia National Forest:

From the last Saturday in April through November 15, 5 trout daily bag limit, 10 trout in possession; and, from November 16 through the Friday preceding the last Saturday in April, 0 trout bag limit, artificial lures with barbless hooks only and trout must be released unharmed and not removed from the water.

Local Rivers and Streams west of Giant Sequoia National Monument and Sequoia National Forest:

From the last Saturday in April through November 15, 5 trout daily bag limit, 10 trout in possession; and, from November 16 through the Friday preceding the last Saturday in April, 0 trout bag limit, artificial lures with barbless hooks only and trout must be released unharmed and not removed from the water.

All other Lakes:

Open all year. No restrictions. 5 trout per day. 10 trout in possession.

 

© 2021 Steve Schalla
This page is not to be copied without my explicit permission.

Holey Meadows Tyler Creek Deer Creek Leavis Campground California Hot Springs White River Poso Creek Alder Creek Upper Kern below Johnsondale South Fork Tule