Stillborn Midge

Stillborn Midge

Online Store

Maps

Fly Box

Fish

Tackle Box

tactics

Fly Swaps
Stillborn Midge
Tying Instructions
Materials:


Notes: Midges hatch year-round and even when other major hatches are in progress, the midges continue to be a food source for the trout. The winter months are often considered to be prime midge months, only due to the lack of any other insect hatches taking place. During this period the trout focus on emerging midge pupae and they can be quite selective. The trout tend to ignore a single midge but will look for midge clusters to inhale. If you encounter a trout coming to the surface for a subtle sip, leaving a faint rise-form, the trout is most likely finding single midges. However, if midge clusters appear, the trout get more active and rapidly feed on the cluster as it drifts down the stream.

The stillborn midge is meant to represent a single midge that is having difficulty emerging from it's shuck. Like the small midge cluster, this is an easy meal and the trout will be attracted to it. Casts should be short and pinpointed to rising trout. This may mean actually kneeling within the stream as to get as physically close to the feeding trout as possible. Utilizing short upstream casts will allow you to diminish drag, working the outside of the feeding lane before casting into the center of the lane. If you encounter midge clusters, try skittering the fly across the current in front of the rising fish. This will grab their attention and proceed to fly in the excitement. Winter months are usually cold and the trout are lethargic, so the best time to midge is Noon to 2 pm.

 

 

Variations:


Stillborn Midge, Pearl
Stillborn Midge, Pearl


Materials:
©2022 Steve Schalla
This page is not to be copied without my explicit permission.