WD-40

WD-40

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Olive WD 40
Tying Instructions
Materials:

Notes:EnglerThis fly was first tied in 1982 for Colorado's Frying Pan River, by Mark Engler. Mark guides for Duranglers Fly Shop out of Durango, Colorado. The WD-40 imitates the larger midges that get trapped in the shuck for extended periods. It is more a style of midge emerger than a specific pattern. Thread and dubbing can be chosen to match the color of any natural, the most popular colors being Olive, Black, Dark Brown, Gray, and Rust. The WD stands for Lemon "Wood Duck", of which each pattern uses this material for the tail and wingcase. The original WD-40 had an olive thread body and a muskrat thorax. There are some substitions in which the Lemon Wood Duck wingcase has been replaced by Krystal Flash or Razor Foam but this would really make it something other than a WD, wouldn't it? Another interesting variation is to substitute the dubbed abdomen with a glass bead or two. You can also easily incorporate legs to the pattern by utilizing the butt ends of the wingcase rather than trimming them flush to the shank.

A recent variation is the WD-50 designed by Carl Stout. Carl takes the pupa one step further with a wing that is busting out of it's shuck to become an emerger. The wing is often a dyed Mallard Flank in Gray, Olive, Wine, or Brown. The tail continues to be tied with Lemon Wood Duck or Mallard dyed Wood Duck and the wingcase is a Pearlescent Flat Tinsel. After 2021, actual Lemon Wood Duck has been difficult to find and you will need to substitute Dyed Mallard Flank, woodduck. Hopefully, the material will be available once more as the Dyed Mallard flank does not have the distinctive barring that the actual Woodduck possess.

Variations:



Brown WD-40 w/ legs
Brown WD40


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BH Black WD-40
Black WD40


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Black Flashy WD-40
WD40


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Loop Wing WD-40
Loop Wing WD40


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Olive Green Bead WD-40
Olive Bead WD40


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Gray WD-50
 WD50


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Tungsten Brown WD-50
 WD50


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